Last edited by Tasho
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

5 edition of Training the Roman cavalry found in the catalog.

Training the Roman cavalry

Ann Hyland

Training the Roman cavalry

from Arrian"s "Ars tactica"

by Ann Hyland

  • 187 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Grange Books in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Arrian.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAnn Hyland.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17402947M
    ISBN 101856278999
    OCLC/WorldCa38746766

    The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire. Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts. They have drawn together evidence from a wide variety of sources: archaeological. In this book, besides observing Caesar's guile, it is well to note Labienus, who demonstrates initiative and intelligence as he handles difficult positions; moving out, for example, with twenty-five cohorts and some cavalry, then maneuvering and tricking the Treveri into a corner reflects real cunning and results in a victory for the Roman forces.

      Below is a brief bibliography on the Roman Cavalry, including articles on tactics, units, training, horses, and equipment. See this bibliography for additional references. Of the books below, the Cheesman, Hyland, and Speidel books are probably some of the most useful. : The Roman Cavalry () by Southern, Pat; Dixon, Karen R. and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices.4/5(20).

    Its great interest lies in the figure-of-eight relief on its left side (fig. 2), for it helps us understand the training of Roman cavalry. Xenophon, in his book on cavalry horsemanship, recommends figure-of-eight riding schools where horses could learn to wheel left and right, shifting forelegs in by: 3.   Since horses will refuse point blank to barge into something they interpret as a solid barrier, cavalry charges against tightly pack infantry either stopped short or swerved past the edges. Loose infantry units were vulnerable to cavalry charge. In any event, roman cavalry were used in a light role. That is, engaging opposing cavalry, scouting.


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Training the Roman cavalry by Ann Hyland Download PDF EPUB FB2

The most bizarre element of the book though is her insistence that the Roman cavalry games described by Arrian were Arrian is not easily accessible, so for that alone this is a useful book, though as usual with Hyland, she is confined to English-language publications, so she is not aware of e.g.

Junkelmann's books on the Roman cavalry.4/5. The cavalry section describes the parade-ground training exercises, forming the only such complete treatise from the Roman world. The author, a professional horse-trainer and equestrian, draws on a new translation of Arrian's work to analyze in detail all the Roman cavalry maneuvers, from charges to mounted javelin throwing, having tried and tested some of them herself.4/5(11).

Even if the book included the most up to date findings, it would still be rather incomplete. First, it is mainly centred on the Roman cavalry from the 1st to the 3rd century AD. There are some references to the Roman cavalry during the Republic, and a few about the fourth century, but only a few.

This came as a major surprise to me and was rather by: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: x, pages: illustrations, map ; 26 cm: Contents: 1.

Arrian --The Man and His Setting Insight into Aspects of Equine Movement and Mentality Cavalry Training --The Horse The Horse's Tack --For Parade and Battle The Cavalry Saddle Bitting --An Analysis of Roman Bitting and its Importance to Efficient.

The cavalry section vividly describes the parade-ground training exercises, forming the only such complete treatise from the Roman world." "While the Roman infantry has been exhaustively examined the role of the cavalry has received little critical attention.

In this valuable new study, Ann Hyland, a professional horse-trainer and equestrian author, aims to redress the balance/5. Book Review by Lindsay Powell Relative to the infantry, the cavalry wing of the Roman army has attracted little critical attention. In Training the Roman Cavalry (), Ann Hyland applied her own experience as a horse trainer to Arrian’s Ars Tactica which dates to Hadrian’s time.

The emphasis and the pieces on the equipment, the horse's diet and the training of both horse and rider come from Ann Hyland's books on "The Horse in the Roman world" and "Training the Roman Cavalry" based on Arrian's Tactical by: 1.

The cavalry section describes the parade-ground training exercises, forming the only such complete treatise from the Roman world. The author, a professional horse-trainer and equestrian, draws on a new translation of Arrian's work to analyze in detail all the Roman cavalry maneuvers, from charges to mounted javelin throwing, having tried and tested some of them herself.5/5(2).

Buy Training the Roman Cavalry: From Arrian's "Ars Tactica" New edition by Ann Hyland (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.

The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire.

Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts. They have drawn together evidence from a wide variety of sources: archaeological /5(2). The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire.

Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts.

They have drawn together evidence from a wide variety of sour/5. The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire. Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts.

They have drawn together evidence from a wide variety of sources: archaeological /5(10). The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire. Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts.

They have drawn together evidence from a wide variety of sources: Cited by: The cavalry of Roman armies before the Second Punic War had been exclusively Roman and allies, with each holding one wing of the battleline (the Romans usually holding the right wing).

After that war, Roman cavalry was always complemented by allied native cavalry (especially Numidia), and was usually combined on just one wing. A very interesting book on cavalry training is: A. Hyland, Training the Roman Cavalry: From Arrian's Tactica (Alan Sutton ). This mixes the available evidence in this treatise by Arrianus with practical input from an experienced rider.

Very useful articles, in English, can also be found in. ‘The Roman Empire and its impact upon Britain’. Non-statutory examples include Hadrian’s Wall Learning Objectives Pupils will use a variety of sources to develop a knowledge base about the Roman Cavalry. They will evaluate similarities and differences between the experience of a cavalryman in the Roman Army and in the modern British Army.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Training in the Roman Army • Limited, but useful, primary sources allow us to reconstruct ideas about Roman Army discipline and training: –Josephus –Frontinus –Arrian –Vegetius • Archaeological evidence continues to fill in the gaps. Genre/Form: Early works Early works to Ouvrages avant Additional Physical Format: Print version: Hyland, Ann.

Training the Roman cavalry. Phoenix Mill ; Dover, NH: Alan Sutton, This chapter explores the development and training of Greek and Roman cavalries. Xenophon discussed Greek and Roman cavalry training, and much of his advice is present in modern horsemanship techniques.

He showed that Athenian cavalry and care of horses had : Ann Hyland. The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire.

Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from .Book Description. The cavalry was a vital part of the army of Rome and it played a significant role in the expansion and success of the Roman Empire. Karen R. Dixon and Pat Southern describe the origins of the mounted units of the Roman army and trace their development from temporary allied troops to the regular alae and cohorts.

They have.Roman Cavalry Hyland, Ann. Training the Roman Cavalry (From Arrian’s Ars Tactica): Gloucestershire; Sutton Publishing Limited, Roman Life Adkins, Lesley and Adkins, Roy A. Handbook to Life in Ancient Rome: New York: Oxford University .